Quincy Jones

Alfredo Rodriguez
Chris Tobin

While he has many fascinating stories to tell, pianist and composer Alfredo Rodríguez is all about the music.  

During his recent visit to our performance studio at WBGO, Rodríguez touched on stories of his life in Cuba and his migration to the United States. There's also his life-changing 2006 Montreux Jazz Festival encounter with Quincy Jones, which has led to “Q” producing two of his recordings for Mack Avenue, including his latest, The Little Dream.

Anna Webber

On another edition of My Music, Cuban pianist Alfredo Rodríguez tells his extraordinary story of crossing the border from Mexico to the United States to find Quincy Jones.

Qwest TV / Photo illustration by Sarah Geledi

What to make of Quincy Jones's new video music service?

Kevin Winters / Getty Images

Quincy Jones, who will turn 85 next month, retains his ability to electrify audiences.

Anna Webber

Christian McBride doesn’t need a big band to make a big impression, as he’s shown us countless times — on the bass, on the bandstand and in the booth. But when he finally did assemble a big band of his own, he saw  results: The Good Feeling, on Mack Avenue, won the 2011 Grammy for Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album.


The opening track to Emily Bear’s latest release, “Into the Blue” earned her a Herb Alpert Young Jazz Composers Award, presented by the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers to honor talented young jazz artists during the earliest stages of their careers. 


Jacob Collier capped off an already wild year by winning two Grammy awards a few weeks ago for "Flintstones" (Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals) and “You And I” (Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella). This was the year where the British multi-instrumentalist says he took his sonic wonderland playground – his “room” in his parent’s home in the UK – and take it on the road.

Nate Smith
Johnalynn Holland

Nate Smith is a drummer in high demand, and he could have gone in almost any direction on his debut album as a leader. What he explores on Kinfolk: Postcards from Everywhere is his family history — from his grandfather, who worked a blue collar job in the Jim Crow South, to his parents, who earned enough to send him to college.