News

View From The Blue in Newark's 1967 Rebellion

Jul 12, 2017
Police
Star Ledger and The Newark Public Library

Through the 50 years since the Newark Rebellion in 1967, the police version of the story has seldom been told.  In 2007, historian and author Adele Oltman  filed this in-depth report for the WBGO Journal.

Oltman spoke to several officers who were there at the time of the unrest broke out, including John DeSimone, who was one of the arresting officers of taxi cab driver John Smith.

Click above to hear Adele Oltman's feature "View From The Blue."

A coalition of parents and caregivers is urging Governor Christie to sign legislation expanding New Jersey's Family Leave program.

Jesse Burns, the executive director of the League of Women Voters of New Jersey, says a few months after finding out she was pregnant, her mother-in-law was diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

A new Monmouth University poll in this year's New Jersey governor's race shows Democrat Phil Murphy with a 27 point lead over Republican Kim Guadagno.

Poll director Patrick Murray says it’ll be an uphill battle for Guadagno to close that gap.

“The only thing that could happen within the fundamentals of this race is if the Republican brand starts to regain some credibility with voters here in New Jersey and Murphy simply just ignores the property tax issue and Guadagno continues to hammer away at her plan and voters start to tune into that.”

Baraka
Sylvia Brewer for WBGO

The Abyssnian Baptist Church hosted a commemoration of the 1967 Newark Rebellion on Tuesday night. The prayer service offered interfaith clergy the opportunity to come together.

 

The event featured Junius Williams, director of the Abbott Leadership Institute, and Mayor of Newark Ras J. Baraka. Both Williams and Baraka spoke about the need for an accurate depiction of Newark prior to and during 1967.  To Baraka, Newark would not be the city it is today without the unrest 50 years ago.

 

Advocates have some concerns about the Christie administration's proposal to transfer responsibility for mental health and addiction services from the New Jersey Department of Human Services to the Department of Health.

State Health Commissioner Cathleen Bennett expects the move will mean a better coordinated system.

"What we currently have is a system where the patient has to navigate to the different providers. Now what we're doing is creating a system where the provider treats the whole person and has all of the resources that will be needed."

United States Senators Cory Booker of New Jersey and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts are introducing legislation to help female inmates deal with the challenges of being imprisoned.

Jessica Jackson Sloan leads Cut 50, a bipartisan initiative to reduce the number of people in prisons and jails. She says incarcerated women face troubling choices.

A Monmouth University Poll finds New Jersey Governor Chris Christie's voter approval ratings remain in the cellar.

Only 15 percent of voters surveyed approve of the job Christie is doing.

Poll director Patrick Murray says photos of Christie on the beach with his family during the recent state government shutdown didn't help his public image.

The leaders of New jersey's legislature say state employees should not be penalized for the three-day government shutdown last week.

Senate President Steve Sweeney plans a Senate session Thursday to act on bipartisan legislation requiring the state to pay workers furloughed because of a delayed budget.

"It's just showing our intent for what we think is important. For the workers that should have been paid, this wasn't their fault that we had an impasse. We should pay them. It was in the budget. It's not like the money is not there."

Newark Evening News

The fight over the city of Newark’s secretary to the Board of Education appointee in 1967, stemmed from the Mayor promising somebody the job, while the majority African American community called for somebody else.  Don Melafronte was Mayor Hugh Addonizio’s chief of staff.

“The job at the board of ed, the secretary to the board of education was essentially a political job.  He was essentially the administrator of the budget and some other stuff at the board of ed.  It had zero to do with curriculum.”

oldnewark.com

Before the 1967 Newark Rebellion, Mayor Hugh Addonizio was getting ready to sign off on a project that would have used one-hundred-and-fifty acres of the city's central ward to erect a state of the art medical school. WBGO's Ang Santos took a stroll with Junius Williams, the director of the Abbot Leadership Institute at Rutgers-Newark, who says that plan would have destroyed the heart of the Newark community.  

Mayor Baraka, announces 2017 Summer Youth Program

Jul 10, 2017

On Monday, July 3, City Mayor, Ras Baraka, announced his ‘2017 Summer Youth Employment Program’. For the third straight year, Mayor Baraka, has reached out and provided jobs for the young adults in the City of Newark.

Newark's Jewish Community: Pre and Post 1967 Rebellion

Jul 10, 2017
Synagogue
The Jewish Society of New Jersey

The population of Newark, and the Jewish Community in particular, dwindled drastically after the 1967 Newark Rebellion. While some call it “white flight,” others say the national push towards suburbanization pulled them away.

Over 65,000 people once made up Newark’s Jewish community. William Helmreich, author and educator, says an undue amount of blame is placed on the 1967 Newark Rebellion for pushing them out. 

Community School Brings Hands-On Education to Kids

Jul 10, 2017

Voyagers’ Community School, located in Eatontown, NJ, was recently recognized by the Middle States Association Commission. The school received an accreditation on an elementary and secondary school level.

The school began in 2004, when Director, Karen Giuffre, saw her son in a public school setting, and wanted something more for him.

David Dinkins Turns 90 on July 10th

Jul 4, 2017
David Dinkins
David Dinkins

David Dinkins made political history in 1990 when he was sworn in as the first African American mayor of New York City.  Dinkins, now a professor at the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs, reflected on his historic journey in a June, 2010 on line interview which first aired on WBGO in 2016.

Scudder Homes
Doug Doyle for WBGO

Attorney and Essex County College professor Linda McDonald Carter is tired about reading how terrible things were for those who lived in the Scudder Homes projects in the 1960's.

Carter and four of her closest friends from that neighborhood came into WBGO to talk to News Director Doug Doyle about their lives before and after the 1967 Rebellion.

New Jersey’s state government shutdown is over and state parks, recreation areas, and historic sites will be open on the Independence Day Holiday.

An agreement on legislation to change the way the state regulates Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield paved the way for Assembly approval of a new budget shortly after midnight.

“I declare the bill passed. New Jersey is back on.”

Assembly Speaker Vinnie Prieto says the Horizon measure puts a limit on the reserves the state’s largest insurer can keep.

New Jersey lawmakers who met with the top official of Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield are optimistic about progress toward resolving differences that have shutdown state government offices for three days.

Lawmakers have been unable to come to terms on legislation to regulate the state’s largest insurer. Governor Christie wants a Horizon bill as part of a deal to approve a budget that would include additional spending Democrats have proposed.

After state lawmakers failed to pass a new budget by the midnight Friday deadline, Governor Chris Christie has signed an executive order shutting down state government.

Essential services including state police, prisons, state hospitals, and key child welfare services will remain in operation.

State recreational areas historic sites and parks are closed and public events there cancelled.

Christie says his family is at the state-owned Governor’s Beach House and might be the only family spending the holiday weekend at Island Beach State Park.

Lisa Durden
Doug Doyle for WBGO

Television personality, pop culture commentator and adjunct professor Lisa Durden was recently fired by Essex County College after an appearance on Fox News' Tucker Carlson show.

WBGO Media Fellow Al Antomattei invited Durden to come into WBGO to talk about her case. 

Durden says she was unfairly dismissed and that she never associated herself with Essex County College when she was defending a Black Lives Matter event that was held for only people of color.

Alexandra Hill

The campaign to close one of New Jersey’s most infamous juvenile detention centers was marked with a rally earlier this week, outside the gateway to a facility that many say is the beginning of the state’s school to prison pipeline.

"It’s pretty much like a house of horrors, from the abuse from the guards, to the lack of medical attention, to the lack of educational programming, it was literally hell on earth.”

Dr. Vanessa Neumann
Allan Wolper for WBGO

Dr. Vanessa Neumann has won an international reputation for tracking the movement of terrorists and drug dealers, from Colombia to Southeast Asia. In December, St. Martin’s Press will publish her new investigative book, titled, “Blood Profits: How American Consumers Unwittingly Fund Terrorists.”

Born in the cauldron of Venezuela, South America, she has roamed the world seeking information and sources for the US State Department, the Pentagon, the United Nations, Interpol and numerous Fortune 500 companies.

The prospect of a state government shutdown is looming in New Jersey because of the stalemate on enacting a new budget.

Governor Chris Christie says he's willing to sign a budget that includes additions Democrats want but only if they also send him legislation to limit the surplus Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield can keep and to transfer the lottery assets to the public employee pension fund.

"So now it's up to Speaker Prieto. If Speaker Prieto wants to close the government, this is going to be his decision."

Ang Santos / WBGO

Speaking from a MTA conference seeking solutions to New York City’s aging infrastructure, Governor Andrew Cuomo declared the Metropolitan Transit Authority’s system under a state of emergency.

“The delays are maddening New Yorkers.  They are infuriated by a lack of communication, unreliability, and now accidents.   Just three days ago we literally had a train come off of the tracks.  It’s a perfect metaphor for the dysfunction of the entire system,” Cuomo said.

A private New Jersey foundation that provides public policy grants says poor fiscal decisions are hampering the state's ability to pay for basic needs, and it’s recommending immediate changes.

The Fund for New Jersey says the most critical financial problem is funding the public employee pension system.  Rutgers University professor and fund trustee Henry Coleman says a balanced approach would include limiting retirees' health coverage commensurate with private employers. 

Alexandra Hill

City officials in Newark, along with a parade of corporate partners, launched a new initiative at city hall today in an effort to drastically reduce the city’s unemployment rate. Mayor Ras Baraka says the Hire Buy Live Newark partnership extends beyond city government to involve Newark's colleges and universities, hospitals, and numerous corporations to create training and job opportunities for more than 2000 residents by the year 2020.

After a year of research, the New Jersey Campus Sexual Assault Task Force has issued a 39-page report on steps colleges must take to make campuses safer.

Patricia Teffenhart is executive director of the New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault and the co-chair of the task force.  She says the recommendations include having every college conduct a sexual violence climate survey to get information from students, faculty and staff.

Students should know where they can confidentially report a sexual assault and have access to counseling and services.

Al Antomattei / WBGO

Nico Hischier is soaking in the celebrity that comes with being a New Jersey Devil.

“I knew it from the beginning that I’m joining a great organization with a lot of history.  I’m really happy to be a Devil,” said Hischier.  “After being drafted, it’s been crazy.  I can’t really believe it.  It’s one thing to the other and it’s just amazing to be here and special.  When I stepped into the rink it’s pretty cool and the locker room is awesome as well.”

New Jersey Devils coach John Hynes welcomes the 18-year-old Swiss player.

More Newark Students To Learn about the 1967 Rebellion

Jun 25, 2017
Chinedu Onyemaobi
Doug Doyle for WBGO

To start off, the title of the course was titled “Global Citizenship in a Global World”. Entering the course, I believed that we will be discussing different figurative role models in history, that has made significant change in the world. I was wrong, to a certain degree.

I was blown away by the history that was embedded in the city of Newark. Professor Junius Williams, who was a major activists during the Newark Riots, spearheaded the class, with his fabulous stories of his experiences not only here in Newark, but also in Montgomery, Alabama during the Jim Crow Era.

Summer movies are about heroes. And in this hyper-sharpened environment of the performance arts, apparently it takes one to know one. This is the season of Hollywood hero movies, which… I mostly skip. What’s Tom Cruise in the Mummy got to say to me? Worse, last week he said he was going to do a Top Gun sequel. He’s 54 now. He was 23 the first time out. What will they call this one, Shogun… or No Gun? Then there’s Transformers: The Last Knight, which I recall vigorously defending first as a toy in 1985 to fellow parents of toddlers and later as a film, 87 installments ago.

Newark Public Library

Life-long Newark resident Richard Cammarieri was a teenager in the city's central ward in 1967.  

"There was a sense that things were quite inferment throughout the 60's if you were paying any attention at all,"  Cammarieri said.  "My father worked in a town not too far from Newark.  I recall drving with him one day to work.  It was probably the second day.  Because we were white, we were able to pass through the road blocks and cross checks without any problem.  Other cars being stopped had black drivers.  Both men and women, old and young, it didn't seem to matter."

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