Governor's race

Ang Santos / WBGO

For weeks, Democrat Phil Murphy has focused on big name endorsements like former President Barack Obama, New Jersey rocker Jon Bon Jovi, and even International Brotherhood of Teamsters President James Hoffa, who says Murphy's opponent is another Chris Christie.

“You know, so long with Chris Christie we’ve had so many problems in the state of New Jersey.  This is a great state.  We’ve got to turn it around.  We need a new man, new thinking, someone that is for the average person in this state and that is our man Phil Murphy,” Hoffa said.

Keanna Faircloth

Democrat Phil Murphy says he’d never be in position to run for New Jersey governor if he never knew Barack Obama.

“He’s always had our backs and New Jersey will always have his back,” Murphy said.

Obama kept his focus mostly on the New Jersey Governor’s race.

Ang Santos / WBGO

Republican candidate Kim Guadagno says she’ll lower Garden State property taxes if elected Governor.  Democrat Phil Murphy says she’s already had eight years to make it happen.

“So she can talk all she wants about audit’s and consolidations and property tax relief, all good and well, but where have you been?  With all due respect, we may not have everything right but I’ll tell you one thing we do have right.  We represent change.”

Ang Santos / WBGO

Recent polling shows a good number of Garden State voters don’t know enough about the Democratic or Republican gubernatorial candidates to decide who they’ll vote for in November’s election.

Republican Kim Guadagno is a former assistant attorney at the state and federal levels, and the first woman to serve as Monmouth County Sheriff. 

Democrat Phil Murphy is a former Goldman Sachs executive. He was an Ambassador to Germany under the Obama Administration, and is running his first campaign for elected office.

The debate will air live on WBGO starting at 7PM.

On Tuesday, Oct. 10, 7:00-8:00 p.m., WBGO will co-host and broadcast one of just two public debates between the Republican and Democratic candidates competing to be the state’s next governor, former U.S. Ambassador to Germany Phil Murphy (D) and New Jersey Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno (R).

The Republican nominee in New Jersey's race for governor is releasing a new TV ad.

In the 30 second spot, Kim Guadagno highlights her plan to cut property taxes.

"That's the difference between Phil Murphy and me. He's already said he will raise your taxes."

Seton Hall public affairs professor Matthew Hale questions whether her ad is connecting with voters.

Ang Santos / WBGO

The magic number so to speak for New Jersey candidates running for Governor is 430,000.  Raising that many dollars is the only way their message will get the exposure brought along with upcoming televised debates.  It’s an uphill climb from the start for third party candidates, fighting for name recognition.

Republican for Governor Kim Guadagno has picked Woodcliff Lake Mayor Carlos Rendo to succeed her as Lieutenant Governor.  Rendo is wasting no time taking shots at the policies Democrat Phil Murphy is putting forth.

"Phil Murphy has proposed a $75 billion increase in government spending.  He has promised to raise taxes on everyone to pay for everything from government run healthcare to a state run bank.  We know what happened the last time we had an out of touch Goldman Sachs millionaire run this state," Rendo said referring to former NJ democratic governor John Corzine.

Ang Santos / WBGO

Former Goldman Sachs executive Phil Murphy picks Assemblywoman Sheila Oliver to be his Lieutenant Governor on November’s Democratic gubernatorial ticket.

“Sheila Oliver shares my vision for a state that once again is fair, is just, is welcoming, is inclusive, and has an economy that not only grows, but ensures that everyone can participate in that growth,” Murphy said.  “Sheila has the breadth of experience needed to meaningfully contribute to turn our state around.”

Ang Santos / WBGO

Green Party candidate for Governor Seth Kaper-Dale says 3rd parties have a history of underperforming in elections, but in this case, he likes his chances against the Democrat and Republican choices.

“I only have to go up against two people and one of them is a Goldman Sachs poster boy, and the other is a Chris Christie poster girl.  We should be able to beat those two,” Kaper-Dale said.

Ang Santos / WBGO

Democrat Phil Murphy says it’s too late for Lieutenant Governor Kim Guadagno to propose new ideas to help New Jersey’s crumbling transportation infrastructure.

A new Monmouth University poll in this year's New Jersey governor's race shows Democrat Phil Murphy with a 27 point lead over Republican Kim Guadagno.

Poll director Patrick Murray says it’ll be an uphill battle for Guadagno to close that gap.

“The only thing that could happen within the fundamentals of this race is if the Republican brand starts to regain some credibility with voters here in New Jersey and Murphy simply just ignores the property tax issue and Guadagno continues to hammer away at her plan and voters start to tune into that.”

Governor Christie's voter approval rating is now at a record low.

Christie's rating is the worst for any governor in any state surveyed by Quinnipiac University in more than 20 years.

Only 15 percent of New Jersey voters approve of the way he's handling his job and 81 percent disapprove.

Pollster Maurice Carroll says 94 percent of Democrats and 58 percent of Republicans have a negative view of Christie's job performance.

"He's not well regarded even by his own party. And the way he's performing lately, he's irrelevant. He doesn't matter."

Ang Santos / WBGO

New Jersey Democrat Jim Johnson likes his chances to secure his party’s nomination for governor on June 6th.  During a town hall meeting in Newark, he delivered a message to people who doubt he can win the primary.

“I think we saw on November 8th that polls can be a little bit off.  I believe particularly because there hasn’t been a lot of polling in this state, one thing.  The polling that matters is going to be on June 6.  And on June 6 I will prevail,” Johnson said.

A new trend has many of the campaign ads in the race for Governor of New Jersey going up online instead of airing on traditional media outlets.

Carl Golden was the press secretary for former Governors Tom Kean and Christie Whitman. He says it's cheaper to put campaign ads on social media and the internet, and they can be effective.

Phil Murphy arrives at NJ Division of Elections
Phil Gregory

Former Goldman Sachs executive Phil Murphy has filed a record 43,000 petitions to get on the June primary ballot as a Democratic contender for Governor of New Jersey.

Fairleigh Dickinson political science professor Peter Woolley says Murphy is the clear front runner for the Democratic nomination.

"He's trying a bit of shock and awe, I think, trying to demonstrate to anybody who might come out and offer in particular financial support to his competitors, that it is futile."

Monday is the filing deadline for candidates who want to run in New Jersey's June primary.

Political analysts expect a battle to get the Republican nomination for Governor.

Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno has won the endorsement of GOP organizations in 10 counties to get favorable placement on the primary ballot and Assemblyman Jack Ciattarelli will have that coveted designation in 7 counties.

Governor's office entrance
Phil Gregory

Former Saturday Night Live comedian Joe Piscopo says he won’t be a Republican candidate, but he could run as an independent in New Jersey's race for Governor.

Political analysts aren't giving him much chance to win.

Fairleigh Dickinson political science professor Peter Woolley says it's nearly impossible for independent candidates to do well in New Jersey elections because they don't have the party organization or money to attract support.

What’s the most important issue in deciding whom to elect as New Jersey’s next governor?

A Quinnipiac University survey of voters puts taxes at the top of the list.

Pollster Maurice Carroll says that’s their biggest concern for 26 percent of voters.

“There was one year many years ago when believe it or not auto insurance was the main issue, but poll in and poll out finds that New Jerseyans are concerned mostly about taxes.”