Government Shutdown

A bill advancing in the New Jersey Senate would require that state parks, recreation areas and historic sites remain open to the public for 7 days if a stalemate over enacting a state budget results in a government shutdown.

Drew Tompkins with the Keep It Green Coalition says those public places should not be held hostage to budget negotiations.

New Jersey legislative leaders and Governor Phil Murphy have until the end of June to reach agreement on a new state budget. A stalemate could risk a potential government shutdown.

Senate President Steve Sweeney and Assembly Speaker Tom Coughlin are resisting the governor’s proposed tax increases and free community college.

Democrat Assemblywoman Patricia Egan Jones does not expect there will be a government shutdown.

A New Jersey lawmaker wants to prevent the public from being inconvenienced if the state doesn't enact a budget on time.

Legislation introduced by Senator Jeff Van Drew calls for motor vehicle agencies, state parks and beaches to remain open for up to ten days if a budget isn't complete by the end of June deadline.

He wants to prevent a recurrence of the public outcry this summer because a deadlock in enacting a new budget forced state beaches and parks to close for three days.

In a rare summer session, New Jersey's Assembly passed several bills in response to the recent three-day government shutdown during the state budget impasse.

A measure requiring state beaches and recreation areas to remain open for the first seven days of a budget-related shutdown won unanimous support.

Assemblyman John McKeon says that would prevent inconvenience during a 4th of July Holiday weekend.

New Jersey's Senate has unanimously approved bipartisan legislation to pay state workers for the days they were furloughed during the recent three-day government shutdown.

Chanting ‘It’s time of give us back our pay” unionized state employees rallied outside the Statehouse in Trenton in support of the measure they say will prevent them from losing money they depend on.

Senator Linda Greenstein says it's a moral obligation to get the measure to the governor's desk as quickly as possible.

The leaders of New jersey's legislature say state employees should not be penalized for the three-day government shutdown last week.

Senate President Steve Sweeney plans a Senate session Thursday to act on bipartisan legislation requiring the state to pay workers furloughed because of a delayed budget.

"It's just showing our intent for what we think is important. For the workers that should have been paid, this wasn't their fault that we had an impasse. We should pay them. It was in the budget. It's not like the money is not there."