Chris Cerf

Ken Downey Jr. / WBGO

It’s been over two decades since plundering graduation rates, and overall poor performance forced the state to seize control of Newark Public Schools.  In recent years, a combination of state and city led initiatives changed education in Brick City.  New Jersey Governor Chris Christie calls the return of local control a watershed moment.

“In the last six years, the accomplishments of this system are very impressive.  The job is certainly not complete, but we’ve made real progress at times in the face of real emotional opposition.”

Ang Santos / WBGO

Governor Chris Christie says the Newark Public Schools district has proven it has the programs, policies, and personnel in place to maintain progress in city schools.

“After more than 20 years of state control the progress made over the last six and a half years will afford the state the opportunity to return the Newark Public Schools to local control.  This is a watershed moment for Newark’s education community.”

Christie says the state board of education will vote next week to approve the transition of control back to Newark Public Schools.

Ang Santos / WBGO

It’s been over twenty years since the state took control of Newark Public School’s because of low graduation rates and overall poor student performance.  It’s been a rocky road for the city’s education system since, and many residents believe not much has changed over the course of time.

At First Avenue School in Newark’s North Ward, about 100 city residents gathered to hear Mayor Ras Baraka’s latest updates on regaining local control of schools.  They had their own concerns.