Allan Harris

The Genius of Eddie Jefferson is the new album from singer Allan Harris. It’s something of a musical sidestep for the crooner. After years of singing in a Nat-like creamy baritone, he’s at his jazziest as he celebrates the godfather of vocalese — the art of creating songs with lyrics to classic jazz records and solos.  

Allan Harris and I go back a ways — 30 years, maybe more. I first heard him in an upstairs lounge on Greene Street (I've never forgotten the joint's comfy chairs), and Allan has come in for interviews and performances on Singers Unlimited ever since. Last year, he brought a band to play songs from Cross That River, his musical about black cowboys on the cattle drives of the American west after the Civil War.  


courtesy of the artist

Allan Harris is a classic crooner with considerable range. His new album, Nobody’s Gonna Love You Better, offers an extraordinary mix of songs from across the spectrum, from standards (“I Remember You,” “Moody’s Mood for Love”) to rock songs by Jimi Hendrix and Steely Dan to his own soulful originals.

He's also created a musical, Cross That River — the story of an ex-slave who became one of the black cowboys in the Wild West. Many of the cattle drovers after the Civil War were black, but we’ve rarely ever seen them in movies.