WBGO Journal

Saturday 6am - 6:30am

Hosted by Doug Doyle

The WBGO Journal is an award-winning half-hour news magazine that airs Saturdays at 6 am. Reports and analysis, informative interviews and features.

Mildred Antenor
David Tallacksen for WBGO

WBGO Journal commentator Mildred Antenor wonders why black women are so hostile to each other.

A Midsummer Night's Dream
Michael Bourne for WBGO

Theater critic Michael Bourne heads back to Shakespeare in the Park for the latest production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream"

New Community Corporation

 After the civil unrest in the summer of 1967, Newark’s public housing outlook was bleak…it was at that time that New Community Corporation was founded by Monsignor William Linder with hopes of creating affordable housing. Hear Linder recall the days following that summer of 1967.

 

Monsignor Linder’s new memoir is titled Out of The Ashes Came Hope. 

Foreclosure
Bob Hennelly for WBGO

Listening to Wall Street based business reporting you would believe that the nation’s foreclosure crisis is in the nation’s rear view mirror. But a WBGO investigation has found that here in New Jersey in places like Newark and East Orange foreclosures are hollowing out entire neighborhoods.

A recent meeting in East Orange brought out  local activists committed to helping their neighbors hold on to their homes.

Zeno Mountain Farm
Jon Kalish for WBGO

Every July developmentally disabled adults spend a month at a unique summer camp in Lincoln, Vermont. Some of them get to live in wheelchair accessible treehouses.  Campers are raving about Zeno Mountain Farm.

Toshi Widoff-Woodson

WBGO Reporter Naomi Brauner spoke with critically acclaimed author Jacqueline Woodson to discuss life as an author, parenting, jazz, and her most recent book, Another Brooklyn.

Woodson spoke to the importance of representation in literature: representing black fatherhood, black Muslims, and Bushwick in the 1970s.

Listen below to Naomi’s extended web interview with Woodson. Warning: book spoilers in the interview.

Money Talks
Michael Bourne for WBGO

WBGO Theater critic Michael Bourne reviews Money Talks.  The musical comedy is playing Off-Broadway.

Bud Lee Archives / Sergio Waksman Design

Media coverage of the 1967 Newark Rebellion depicted chaos in New Jersey’s largest city, but many people who were there say some major inaccuracies were reported as fact.

“Sniper Fire from open windows kills two policemen a fire captain shot in the back while answering a false alarm and several bystanders. Officials say the snipers, some not believed to be Newark residents use guns stolen from a local rifle factory.  Even machine guns were used,” said one movie house newsreel following the Newark riots.

Pipeline
Michael Bourne for WBGO

WBGO Theater Critic Michael Bourne reviews Pipeline at Lincoln Center Theater.

Dunkirk
Harlan Jacobson for WBGO

WBGO film critic Harlan Jacobson gives high marks to Christopher Nolan's latest movie Dunkirk.

Bob Wolff
Doug Doyle for WBGO

The sports broadcasting world lost one of its finest this past weekend. Bob Wolff, the only sportscaster to call play-by-play of championships in all four major North American professional team sports, has died at the age of 96.

Wolff died peacefully in his South Nyack home Saturday night.  The Yankees said in a team statement, "Bob Wolff's inconic, Hall-of Fame broadcasting career was matched by his class and character."  Bob was a guest on SportsJam with Doug Doyle in 2014. 

1984
Michael Bourne for WBGO

Theater Critic Michael Bourne has his thoughts on the politically edgy 1984 on Broadway.

Robert Icke and Duncan Macmillan have adapted the iconic George Orwell novel for this production at Hudson Theater Broadway.

oldnewark.com

Before the 1967 Newark Rebellion, Mayor Hugh Addonizio was getting ready to sign off on a project that would have used one-hundred-and-fifty acres of the city's central ward to erect a state of the art medical school. WBGO's Ang Santos took a stroll with Junius Williams, the director of the Abbot Leadership Institute at Rutgers-Newark, who says that plan would have destroyed the heart of the Newark community.  

Newark's Jewish Community: Pre and Post 1967 Rebellion

Jul 10, 2017
Synagogue
The Jewish Society of New Jersey

The population of Newark, and the Jewish Community in particular, dwindled drastically after the 1967 Newark Rebellion. While some call it “white flight,” others say the national push towards suburbanization pulled them away.

Over 65,000 people once made up Newark’s Jewish community. William Helmreich, author and educator, says an undue amount of blame is placed on the 1967 Newark Rebellion for pushing them out. 

Scudder Homes
Doug Doyle for WBGO

Attorney and Essex County College professor Linda McDonald Carter is tired about reading how terrible things were for those who lived in the Scudder Homes projects in the 1960's.

Carter and four of her closest friends from that neighborhood came into WBGO to talk to News Director Doug Doyle about their lives before and after the 1967 Rebellion.

Lisa Durden
Doug Doyle for WBGO

Television personality, pop culture commentator and adjunct professor Lisa Durden was recently fired by Essex County College after an appearance on Fox News' Tucker Carlson show.

WBGO Media Fellow Al Antomattei invited Durden to come into WBGO to talk about her case. 

Durden says she was unfairly dismissed and that she never associated herself with Essex County College when she was defending a Black Lives Matter event that was held for only people of color.

Alexandra Hill

The campaign to close one of New Jersey’s most infamous juvenile detention centers was marked with a rally earlier this week, outside the gateway to a facility that many say is the beginning of the state’s school to prison pipeline.

"It’s pretty much like a house of horrors, from the abuse from the guards, to the lack of medical attention, to the lack of educational programming, it was literally hell on earth.”

More Newark Students To Learn about the 1967 Rebellion

Jun 25, 2017
Chinedu Onyemaobi
Doug Doyle for WBGO

To start off, the title of the course was titled “Global Citizenship in a Global World”. Entering the course, I believed that we will be discussing different figurative role models in history, that has made significant change in the world. I was wrong, to a certain degree.

I was blown away by the history that was embedded in the city of Newark. Professor Junius Williams, who was a major activists during the Newark Riots, spearheaded the class, with his fabulous stories of his experiences not only here in Newark, but also in Montgomery, Alabama during the Jim Crow Era.

Summer movies are about heroes. And in this hyper-sharpened environment of the performance arts, apparently it takes one to know one. This is the season of Hollywood hero movies, which… I mostly skip. What’s Tom Cruise in the Mummy got to say to me? Worse, last week he said he was going to do a Top Gun sequel. He’s 54 now. He was 23 the first time out. What will they call this one, Shogun… or No Gun? Then there’s Transformers: The Last Knight, which I recall vigorously defending first as a toy in 1985 to fellow parents of toddlers and later as a film, 87 installments ago.

Newark Public Library

Life-long Newark resident Richard Cammarieri was a teenager in the city's central ward in 1967.  

"There was a sense that things were quite inferment throughout the 60's if you were paying any attention at all,"  Cammarieri said.  "My father worked in a town not too far from Newark.  I recall drving with him one day to work.  It was probably the second day.  Because we were white, we were able to pass through the road blocks and cross checks without any problem.  Other cars being stopped had black drivers.  Both men and women, old and young, it didn't seem to matter."

atlantictheater.org

Not every New York theatre is a grand palace. WBGO theater critic Michael Bourne is staying busy after the Tony Awards.  You can hear his stories of watching productions in places like churches and warehouses by clicking the link above.  

CHUCK STEWART / COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Saxophone legend Sonny Rollins is attaching his legacy to Harlem in a big way.  He’s donated a life’s worth of writings, recordings and other materials to The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at the New York Public Library.  Rollins recently sat down with Jazz Night In America’s Christian McBride and NPR’s Audie Cornish to talk about it.

hearingisbelievingfilm.com

  

Twenty-three-year-old insrumentalist composer Rachel Flowers has spent the entirety of her life developing an ear for music.  Born 15 weeks premature, Flowers lost her eyesight at birth.  Lorenzo Destefano’s new film ‘Hearing is Believing’ takes us into Rachel Flowers’ world.  

“We shot for 52 days over almost a two-year period.  It got bigger than we expected.  It’s about a little girl, in a little town, in a little house, but we found a big story there we feel,” said Destefano.   “We call her hyper abled, as opposed to disabled.”

Shannon Rouillard
Doug Doyle for WBGO

The Director of the U.S. Open Women's Championship next month at Trump National Bedminister has quite a story to tell.  Shannon Rouillard didn't start playing golf until she was 15.  She was a gymnast before that, but her father told her she needed to pursue a sport that could lead to a scholarship in college.  Golf was the choice.

Shannon was driven to succeed at golf.  She was a walk-on star at the University of Oregon and eventually became the head coach at Oregon for eight seasons.

Julius Caesar
Shakespeare in the Park

Summer means baseball, barbecues, heat -- and free Shakespeare in the Park.  Theater critic Michael Bourne  reviews the first of the plays this summer at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park.

Alexandra Hill / 4323619530

The city of Newark recently celebrated it’s third class of Hire Newark graduates. The unique job readiness program, in partnership with Newark Beth Israel Medical Center and RWJBarnabas Health, that is giving unemployed residents a fresh outlook on life.

“We are so immeasurably different than people think we are by just looking at us.”

Fatima Hargrove is one of 20 graduates of Hire Newark, an employment boot camp and job readiness program that helps chronically unemployed residents re-enter the workforce.

New Jersey's Gubernatorial Race is Set

Jun 9, 2017
Kim Guadagno
The New York Times

The New Jersey Gubernatorial race is now set after Democrat and former Goldman Sachs Executive Phil Murphy and Republican Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno won their respective primaries earlier this week.

Guadagno greeted her party faithful in West Orange on Primary night.  She took her shots at her new opponent and addressed reporters on her first campaign stop after the election.  Guadagno defended why she didn't mention Governor Christie in her victory speech.

Tony Awards
Michael Bourne for WBGO

The Tony Awards will be presented on Sunday.  WBGO Theater Critic Michael Bourne gives us an idea of what we can expect.

Click above to hear Michael's thoughts.

Ang Santos / WBGO

Thomas Chapin’s undeniable talent could have been enough inspiration for an Emmy-Award winning documentarian to make a movie. Stephanie Castillo who has just put the finishing touches on Night Bird Song:  The Incandescent Life of Thomas Chapin has another pretty important reason.  She’s his sister in-law.

The Ballad of Little Jo
Two River Theater for WBGO

Singer-Songwriter and legendary football star Mike Reid is always looking to what's next in his life.  One of the musicals he's written is running at Two River Theater in Red Bank, NJ from June 3rd through June 25th. 

Reid wrote the music for The Ballad of Little Jo in 1997, but he thinks this performance of the show will be the best yet.  The book by Reid, Sarah Schlesinger and John Dias was based on the film The Ballad of Little Joe by Maggie Greenwald.

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