Lars Gotrich

Absolutely Not are absolutely fab. After a few promising EPs of glammed-up garage-punk, the Chicago band is set to release Errors, its spastic and ridiculously fun debut full-length. This is a punk record dialed into an alien frequency with a heavy production that makes the spare instrumentation (guitar, keyboards, drums) sound like a spaceship crashing into Earth.

Chuck Johnson's music always finds the calm at the center of the storm. He's best known for his hypnotic, yet lyrical, solo guitar work, but for his new record Balsams Johnson meditates on — and through — the lush ambiance of the pedal steel.

The Holy Circle makes dark synth-pop that's velvet to the touch — and a sonic sawblade to the core. After last year's EP, Terence Hannum of the experimental metal band Locrian and his wife Erica Burgner-Hannum of Unlucky Atlas were joined by drummer Nathan Jurgenson (Screen Vinyl Image). The Baltimore trio's self-titled debut album finds that space between Ultravox's synthetic melodrama, Jesu's heavy shoegaze and The Knife's cold, yet sensual, vocal melodies.

Apart from from Buddhist temples, parts of Japan sure do look like Central Illinois. At least that's the story sweetly told in director Chris Strong's video for "My Instincts Are The Enemy," where Japanese and Japanese Americans sing along to the song while bowling, making noodles and getting tattooed.

"Where the birds sing a pretty song..." Worry not — no spoilers ahead.

Burial's been lurking in some subterranean realms lately.

"There's no use for the human soul — it died for the digital age!"

"Negative Boogie," the title track from Omaha musician David Nance's new album is a stuttering rave-up, a mad dogpile of shredded Pere Ubu nerves and a little bit of Sonny Sharrock skronk-punk.

Daniel Menche makes noise. Loud. Clattering. Ritualistic... but altogether thoughtfully constructed deconstruction. The Portland, Ore.-based musician's discography goes back nearly three decades, a jagged line of antagonism that's simultaneously become more extreme and more meditative over those many years.

Now, Now is back ... now. Five years ago, the Minneapolis band released Threads -- not only one of our 50 favorite albums of 2012, but the kind of record that left us wanting more.

"Sounded." That's a rough translation of Lød from Danish and one way to think about the ominous, electric shadows cast by this new post-punk band. Formed in Copenhagen by classmates, Lød first took its cues from Iceage and the surrounding scene before ditching the noise and locking into a motorik groove. The band's self-titled EP comes out mid-summer, and will send you into a trance.

Hundred Waters' music tugs like a loose thread, every shifting emotion illuminated by synths and beats that tug just a little harder. The electronic trio has always been on curiosity on OWSLA, the label founded by Skrillex, but a tempering presence.

When the reunited LCD Soundsystem played five nights at Brooklyn Steel in early April, the band brought along two new songs, delighting a legion of dedicated followers who have been clamoring for new material. Well, now James Murphy and company will release those songs at midnight — "and I mean, literally, midnight," he writes in a lengthy post on Facebook (embedded below). "Wherever you are.

We project ourselves into space, even if most of us will never rocket out of orbit in our lifetime.

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