Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

John Feeley, the U.S. ambassador to Panama, is stepping down from his post, citing irreconcilable differences with the Trump administration, Reuters reports.

Simon Bramhall, the British surgeon who branded his initials onto patients' livers during transplant surgeries at least twice, has been ordered to do 120 hours of community service and pay £10,000 (more than $13,600).

Bramhall pleaded guilty in December to two counts of assault for branding his patients.

Two 15-year-old boys have been sentenced to 5 years of probation over the livestreamed sexual assault of a 15-year-old girl in Chicago last March.

As NPR reported at the time, the girl, then a freshmen in high school, was sexually assaulted by as many as six different boys and men. Video of the attack was streamed on Facebook Live. Dozens of people watched, none of whom called police to report the rape.

Ecuador says it has granted citizenship to Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, as officials try to find a way for him to leave the Ecuadorean embassy in London without risking legal action.

Assange, who is Australian, first sought refuge at the embassy more than five years ago to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he faced an investigation over rape allegations. He was granted asylum, and has been holed up in the embassy ever since.

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has confirmed that he had an extramarital affair before he was elected in 2016 — but he denies allegations that he used a naked photo to threaten to blackmail the woman he was sleeping with.

The creator of an anonymously sourced list of men accused of sexual misconduct has chosen to identify herself, as rumors swirled that she would be named in a forthcoming article in Harper's magazine.

The "S***** Media Men" list first circulated among women working in media in October, shortly after the explosive New York Times story detailing the sexual harassment allegations against Harvey Weinstein.

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

Walmart is raising wages for new employees from $10 an hour to $11, expanding paid parental leave and offering a one-time bonus to eligible workers, actions that the company says will affect more than 1 million employees in the U.S.

The changes were announced Thursday. Later the same day, Walmart announced it is closing 63 Sam's Club stores, after "a thorough review of our existing portfolio."

Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner, who is calling on the Trump administration to allow states to legalize marijuana without federal interference, is continuing his nearly weeklong standoff with Attorney General Jeff Sessions over the issue. In an interview with NPR, he suggests that if the Department of Justice doesn't back off, it might spur Congress to act.

After the Trump administration promised Florida that the state would be exempt from expanded offshore oil drilling, other coastal states had just one question: "What about us?"

From Oregon to South Carolina, governors and other leaders are publicly noting that Florida does not have a monopoly on picturesque coasts, tourist economies or local opposition to offshore drilling. But currently, it's the only state to have received a pledge from the administration that it won't be considered for new oil and gas platforms.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

Rescue efforts continue in Santa Barbara County, California, with search teams looking for people who were caught by massive mudslides that swamped houses and trapped cars on Tuesday.

At least 17 people have died as a result of the mudslides, triggered when heavy rains hit hills that were recently devastated by wildfires, The Associated Press reports.

Some people are still unaccounted for, and the death toll is expected to climb, Danielle Karson reports for NPR.

A federal energy regulator has rejected a proposed rule that would have subsidized nuclear and coal plants, helping those fuel sources compete with cheaper natural gas and renewables.

The rule was described by the Department of Energy as a way to promote the resilience of the electric grid — that is, its ability to provide reliable energy in the face of disruptive events like bad weather.

James Damore, the former Google engineer who was fired after he wrote a memo sharply criticizing diversity efforts at the company, has filed a class-action lawsuit against his former employer alleging that the tech giant discriminates against conservative white men.

"Google executives and employees condemned Damore, his memo, and his views," according to the lawsuit, filed Monday. Damore says he was laughed at, personally insulted and attacked, before ultimately being fired in August.

More than 200 African migrants managed to scale the fence surrounding the Spanish enclave Melilla on Sunday, successfully reaching European Union soil.

Melilla is a coastal city, surrounded by the Mediterranean on one side and Morocco on the other three sides. The enclave — along with the similar city of Ceuta — has been a site of migrant crossings for years, some successful and many more attempted.

Eleven royal princes in Saudi Arabia have been arrested, according to Saudi authorities, allegedly after they protested over a decree that stops the government from covering the cost of their electric and water bills.

The princes also demanded "compensation for a death sentence implemented in 2016 against one of their cousins," Reuters reports.

A small fire broke out on the roof of Trump Tower in Manhattan on Monday, prompting a response from the New York City Fire Department.

President Trump was in Washington, D.C., at the time of the fire, The Associated Press reports.

A spokesperson for the fire department said there were no evacuations from the building, NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports.

However, there were two injuries — a firefighter received a minor injury and a civilian is "suffering from a serious, life-threatening injury," Hansi says.

Dunkin' Donuts has removed all artificial dyes from its doughnuts, nearly one year ahead of schedule, as the company continues to work to find replacements for synthetic coloring in its other menu items.

Rick Golden, Manager of Donut Excellence for Dunkin' Brands, announced the news on Thursday, saying that "bright, colorful confections" are a hallmark of Dunkin's doughnut lineup. The colors will remain, but the artificial colorings will be gone.

As a large, powerful winter storm passes north into Nova Scotia, cold weather is sticking around in the Northeast.

"An arctic outbreak will keep temperatures 20 to 30 degrees below average across the northeastern U.S.," the National Weather Service says.

Updated at 9:25 p.m. ET

A massive winter storm has brought hurricane-force winds, blizzard conditions and damaging coastal flooding to eastern New England, one day after it delivered unusual cold and snow to the South.

Starting this week, companies in Iceland are required to demonstrate that they pay male and female employees fairly — without gender discrimination. Failing to do so can result in daily fines.

The law, which was passed last year and went into effect on Monday, is believed to be the first of its kind in the world and covers both the private and public sectors.

Cold enough for ya?

From the Midwest to the East Coast, the chilly wintertime temperatures are a hot topic of conversation. Yes, it's cold. And it's going to be getting colder — a winter storm is moving from Florida up toward Maine, bringing freezing precipitation and even chillier temperatures.

Meanwhile, have we mentioned that it's cold?

Vice Media has placed two senior executives on leave, less than two weeks after The New York Times published a story about multiple accounts of sexual harassment at the company known for its edgy and sometimes explicit content.

Hoda Kotb, who has been filling in for Matt Lauer since he was fired in late November for sexual misconduct, has been officially named co-anchor of NBC's Today show.

Kotb joins Savannah Guthrie at the anchor desk — making this Today's first-ever all-female anchor team.

In addition to co-anchoring the first two hours of Today, Kotb will also continue to co-host the fourth hour of the show with Kathie Lee Gifford. (The third hour is currently hosted by Megyn Kelly.)

2018 is off to a frigid start for vast swaths of the U.S.

From Texas to Ohio, temperatures are 15 to 25 degrees lower than average, the National Weather Service says. Brutally cold temperatures continue in the Northeast. There's a hard freeze warning across the Deep South — and a chance of snow in New Orleans.

It's 17 degrees in Atlanta. There's a low of 14 degrees in Tupelo, Miss. In Dallas, temperatures will stay below freezing all day.

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

If you've got a burning secret about the 13 pieces of art missing from Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the clock is ticking.

Share the details in the next four days, and you'll earn a cool $10 million.

Wait until 2018, and that reward will be slashed in half.

The U.S. Department of the Treasury has announced new sanctions on two individuals within the North Korean government, both of whom are reportedly prominent figures within Kim Jong Un's ballistic weapons development program.

Ri Pyong Chol and Kim Jong Sik are now both blacklisted — which means any assets they have in the U.S. will be frozen, although as NPR's David Welna notes, "It's not clear whether either of them, in fact, has any U.S. assets." Additionally, Americans will generally be prohibited from doing business with them.

On Christmas Day, The Salt Lake Tribune denounced Sen. Orrin Hatch's "utter lack of integrity" and called for him to end his 42-year career in the Senate.

Hatch, in response, told the paper he was "grateful for this great Christmas honor."

In Liberia, voters are heading to the polls to decide on their next president, choosing between an international soccer star or the nation's long-time vice president.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, a Nobel Peace Prize winner and the first female head of state elected in Africa, is stepping down at 79, after two terms in office.

The runoff election to determine her replacement is noteworthy — this will be the first time in 70 years that one democratically elected Liberian government passes power to another legitimately elected government.

Erica Garner, a 27-year-old activist whose father's dying words became a rallying cry for protest against police brutality, has been hospitalized in serious condition after a heart attack, according to multiple reports.

Eric Garner, a black man who died in 2014 after a white NYPD officer put him in a chokehold, was recorded repeatedly telling the officer, "I can't breathe." A grand jury did not indict any officers over his death, a decision that prompted protests across the country.

Alexei Navalny, an outspoken critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, will not be allowed to run in next year's presidential election in Russia, officials announced on Monday.

Putin is anticipated to win re-election yet again, continuing nearly two decades of dominance over Russian politics.

"Navalny is implicitly barred from running for office because of a conviction in a fraud case which has been viewed as political retribution," The Associated Press writes. "He could have run if he [were] given a special dispensation or if his conviction was cancelled."


A suicide bomber in Kabul killed at least 6 people in an attack early Monday, near the Afghan intelligence agency.

The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attack through its news agency Amaq.

One of the victims was a woman traveling in a car as it was passing by the site of the explosion, The Associated Press reports.

The exact target of the attack is unclear, the AP says.

Reuters, which confirmed five deaths with the Afghan interior ministry, reports that all of the known victims were civilians.

Pages